Developing with HTML5 may have never been a more promising venture for organizations as many groups begin to support the language. Because HTML5 is a highly mobile, cross-platform programming language, it is important it gets the support it needs from a variety of developers in order to be worth the time of the companies that use it. Luckily, public support appears to be picking up for the impressive coding system, and it may wind up at the top of several top tech teams' radar. Coding HTML5 forms for use on a variety of different operating systems, tablets and mobile devices may now be one of the easier things a company can do to increase their cross-platform compatibility.

According to Readwrite, HTML5's biggest supporter right now isn't Google - which has traditionally pushed support of the language - but Apple. The article goes on to highlight Adobe's support of HTML5 that happened afterward, ensuring that there would me several large tech companies now collaborating to make the language a power house of the 21st century. When several tech leaders come together to support a language, it is safe to assume that anyone working with it will be assured that there will be many more options for deployment.

Javascript and HTML5
Utilizing HTML5/jQUERY is one way to make sure that Java can be used with HTML5 widgets, but there are other ways as well. The newly created DukeScript, for example, allows Java developers to create HTML5 apps within Java, according to Javaworld. This kind of cross-pollination of languages allows for a variety of different development skill sets to work together to create remarkable pieces of code, and that kind of compatibility is highly useful in the modern setting where many developers have to specialize in order to become the best in their fields.

As HTML5 and jQuery become more commonly used languages, there will be a broader range of options for deploying them on a variety of different user environments. Finding the best ways to make these diverse systems work within a variety of contexts will rely on support from others in the community as well as strong creative problem solving skills on behalf of those designing the software. The good news is that there is already a large well of support for these languages, and there will probably be more to come as HTML5 and jQUERY continue to pick up steam.