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Posts tagged with 'ios'

Enhance your apps with the new Xuni iOS CheckBox

One of the unfortunate realities in iOS development is that Apple doesn't provide you with a CheckBox control. Though this control is common to other platforms, Apple has directed users to either use a UISwitch or modify a UIButton to get similar behavior. Since there isn't an out-of-the-box solution for iOS, we've included a new Xuni CheckBox control with the 2016v1 release.

Xuni FlexChart Annotations Deep Dive

Chart annotations are a great way to call attention to specific details in your charts. As a new addition to FlexChart in Xuni 2016v1, we've introduced a number of different annotation types and configuration options. In this article, we'll highlight these different configuration options, and provide a few common use cases for chart annotations.

How to Use the Xuni iOS Calendar with EventKit

The new calendar control in the 2016v1 release of Xuni enables a new way of visualizing time related data for iOS users. A major point of interest is using the Xuni calendar control with the calendar data stored on your iOS device. Apple provides an API for accessing this built-in calendar data (such as events and reminders) called EventKit. In this article we'll examine both how to populate the calendar control with local data, as well as how to save new events using EventKit.

Build in 10 Tweets: Xamarin, Socks, and Superheroes!

If you follow any Microsoft-related news, you've probably heard that Xamarin will now be available for free with Visual Studio. That's great news for .NET developers (native mobile in C#!), great news for enterprises (no more excuses about avoiding mobile!), and REALLY great news for us at Xuni.

Using Xuni Block Based Events for iOS Event Handling

Last week, we touched on some changes to the Xuni iOS control delegates. We've also added a different mechanism altogether for triggering event based behavior without the use of delegates. In this article we'll cover how to use this new style of delegate-less iOS event handlers via block based events.

A Deep Look at the New Xuni Calendar Control

The Xuni Calendar control provides multiple date selection with month and year views. It includes built-in navigation, animation and globalization so you can get up and running very quickly. You can customize the appearance and the selection behavior to fit your requirements.

Changes to Xuni Control Delegates and C# Event Signatures

The new 2016v1 release has made a few changes to the native iOS control delegates to provide some improved behaviors when dealing with multiple instantiations of the same control type, and to give the controls better support for the C# style events available in Xamarin.iOS.

Xuni 2016 v1 Release – See What’s New

The first Xuni release of 2016 is finally here! We've packed a lot into this release including a new calendar control that fills a major gap in the standard toolkits, as well as several major enhancements for FlexGrid and FlexChart. Each feature we've added delivers new functionality and helps improve the mobile experience in some way. And as always, everything new in this release is supported in all the Xuni platforms: iOS, Android, Xamarin.Forms, Xamarin.Android, and Xamarin.iOS.

Data Mapping Provides Auto Lookup Capabilities for FlexGrid

Data Mapping provides auto lookup capabilities in FlexGrid. For example, you may want to display a customer name instead of his ID, or a color name instead of its RGB value. It’s useful when you have an ID or index field that is unreadable or not user-friendly. You can use data mapping with a readonly column or one that can be edited. FlexGrid handles the mapping for you so the user can select a value from a user-friendly list while the underlying value or key is updated. Data mapping is a common grid feature also referred to as lookup.

Adding a Share Button to an Objective-C iOS App

Xuni gives you the ability to turn your chart or gauge control into an image using the getImage method, but you may wonder how you can easily share this with others. Apple provides some tools to for this purpose not only gives you easy access to any available sharing options (Mail, Message, Facebook, etc.), but also gives you the ability to quickly save and print your data visualization. In this article, we'll cover the highlights of implementing a sharing button in a small iOS app.

Getting Started with Xuni and Xamarin.iOS

If you're evaluating or just getting started using Xuni in a Xamarin.iOS app then start right here. This blog post gives you the inside scoop to everything available to you to get up and running with Xuni and Xamarin.iOS.

Using a SQLite Database with Xuni iOS

A common concern for many data driven apps is whether to store data locally on device or have data available via webservice. Both options can potentially be valid choices depending on your application. While we've covered fetching and parsing web data on iOS we haven't spent as much time on data stored locally, particularly in a database. Apple provides some libraries for interacting with SQLite databases on iOS, and in this article we'll explore using a SQLite database with several Xuni controls.

Creating a Xamarin Bindings Library for a Custom iOS Control

Xamarin seems to magically allow C# developers the opportunity to create native mobile apps with familiar tools, and you may be wondering how does it really work? Xamarin produces native apps, but how exactly does a native control interact with your C# code? This article will shed some light on those questions by showing how to make a custom native control accessible through Xamarin.iOS and all of the intermediary steps involved.

Using iOS Frameworks in Xcode's Interface Builder

If you've ever wished you could use a third-party framework in XCode's interface builder, you'll be glad to know there's a workaround for enabling some of this functionality. Sometimes it's much easier to do all of the layout and positioning in storyboards using constraints and autolayout. Sure, you can create a view and set the custom class via the identity inspector, but you're essentially stuck with a blank view in the designer that you'll have to fully configure in code. There is a workaround for this though, and a mechanism to add in some of the interface builder functionality that third party frameworks often lack.

How to Create an iOS Framework for a Custom Control

iOS Frameworks are a mechanism for packaging classes that's easy to use and distribute. Apple provides a number of its own Frameworks—such as UIKit, Foundation, and CoreData—that all iOS developers will be familiar with. These shared resources can be static or dynamic libraries that, when incorporated into your application, provide expanded functionality. They improve cross-project code reuse, and they're the preferred delivery method for third-party libraries. In this article, we'll cover creating an iOS framework from our custom checkbox control.

Project Islandwood: Testing the Windows Bridge for iOS

Many months ago Microsoft announced their intention to enable iOS developers the ability to use their objective C code inside a Windows 10 application using a tool dubbed Project Islandwood. News on the progress of the tool was quiet for a few months, but back in August Microsoft went ahead and released the opensource project to GitHub as the Windows Bridge for iOS. I was quite curious to try this tool out to see how well it worked, what the projects looked, and experience the novelty of looking at objective-c code in Visual Studio. After spending some time playing with it I wanted to share some of my experiences working with it.

Creating a Custom iOS Checkbox Control in Objective-C

What actually goes into creating a custom control? This article is meant to answer some of that question by providing a walkthrough for creating a simple iOS control. We'll focus on creating a custom iOS checkbox control, and demonstrate the necessary steps to make the control usable in the Xcode designer and your application.

An Experiment: Using Xuni in tvOS with the new AppleTV

The new AppleTV comes packed with a new tvOS (which is similar to iOS) that allows developers to build apps to target the new devices AppStore. I thought it would be an interesting experiment to see whether the current version of Xuni iOS would work in this environment and document some of the process.

Fetching and Parsing Web data with Xuni for iOS

It’s increasing common that a mobile app relies on some data which is not local to the device itself and is instead delivered via a web service. A few months ago we introduced the native versions of Xuni with a pair of webinars that demonstrated using Xuni to create a simple weather application. We chose this specific example since it represents the common case of visualizing up to the minute data obtained by a web service, and allows us to use FlexGrid and FlexChart to neatly present the data. Today, we’ll be further examining fetching web data and parsing either JSON or XML on iOS.

Webcast: How to Decide on Hybrid vs. Native

Mobile App Development is a huge opportunity for all developers, but language and platform differences can make it difficult to know where to start. Does it make sense to invest time and resources to develop native apps that are specialized for a particular platform or are you better served by creating a web app that can be used more generically across multiple platforms? Here, we will discuss the advantages and disadvantages to each approach as well as demonstrate a potential real world application using each scenario. We will guide you through building the same application using both Objective-C and pure JavaScript to highlight the similarities, differences, and benefits of each approach.