Today's workforce is more competitive than ever, especially when it comes to attracting potential employees to open positions. Companies cannot afford to lose their industry's top talent to their competitors if they want to remain an impactful force in the sector. Thankfully, there are a few strategies organizations can leverage to not only ensure they are appealing to job candidates, but are retaining the employees they currently have.

Unified communications is key
When it comes to providing for the next generation of workers, unified communications is an absolute essential. TechRadar's Leslie Ferry noted that millennials don't just want to work for a company with a system of seamlessly connected platforms, they have come to expect it. In this way, companies should look to grow their mobility, not limit it.

"Millennials expect to be able to connect anytime, anywhere, whether they want to access IM on their smartphone at lunch, video conference from a coffee shop or even from the couch on their tablet, or find the location and presence of their colleagues from their laptop," Ferry wrote.

Mobile resources are critical
In order to ensure that mobility is extended in such a way that is not only useful but beneficial for the company as a whole, decision-makers must provide resources for workers to leverage via their mobile devices. For the best access possible, administrators should launch internal mobility efforts that include the establishment of the business's own mobile applications. When it comes to the development of these programs, HTML5 form can provide the cross-platform functionality that is so crucial in today's corporate environment. This way, no matter what device or operating system is being leveraged, the Web application will operate correctly on every device.

The bottom line: Flexibility
Overall, today's top talent candidates are looking for positions that offer the flexibility they expect from an employer. And with unified platforms and mobile resources, this adaptability is all but guaranteed.

"[M]illennials want choices about how to deliver a job well done," wrote Forbes contributor Kathryn Dill.